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Remarkable Photographs of Pueblo Pottery Making from the Turn of the Century

These beautiful pots and vessels are like none in the world because of the unique process by which they are made and because of the distinctive decorations that make them truly special. Around the turn of the century, photographers were documenting the old ways of American Indians, though today many Puebloan potters still use the same painstaking methods their ancestors did to make their vessels. With all the time and care that goes into making a Pueblo vessel, it’s no wonder that they have remained highly sought-after and valued pieces.

Four Hopi women, two are decorating pottery and two, with squash-blossom hairstyles, are standing in the background, circa 1903

Four Hopi women, two are decorating pottery and two, with squash-blossom hairstyles, are standing in the background, circa 1903. Via/ Library of Congress

Hopi potter decorating a vessel, 1900

Hopi potter decorating a vessel, 1900. Via/ Library of Congress

pottery painter circa 1906

Pottery painter circa 1906. Via/ Library of Congress

Santa Clara Pueblo, New Mexico, circa 1905

Firing pots at Santa Clara Pueblo, New Mexico, circa 1905. Via/ Library of Congress

Hopi woman using the coil method to build a pot, circa 1903

Hopi woman using the coil method to build a pot, circa 1903. Via/ Library of Congress

Potter building her kiln, circa 1906

Potter building her kiln, circa 1906. Via/ Library of Congress

If you enjoyed this then click the “Next Page” button to see how Wedgwood pottery was made back in the 1950s!

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