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10 Original Ads for Collectible Vintage Decor That Are Making Us Swoon

If you ever wished you could be a time traveler just so you could live in a 1940s house or cook in a 1950s kitchen, then you probably enjoy looking at old advertisements from the era. Or perhaps you imagine what it must have been like to build a wedding registry back then or what the average housewife scrimped and saved to buy. Ads from the era do give us an idea of prices and how much of a certain thing a woman might expect to have in her home. Have a look at these vintage ads for home and kitchen items which are highly collectible today.

10) Heywood Wakefield

This iconic furniture epitomized post-war prosperity. The simple pieces harkened back to the Art Deco designs of the 1930s, while adding a new spin on the concept through blonde wood. These were the furniture sets to have back in the day.

9) Revere Ware

We’ve seen these pans for sale for anywhere from $15 to $50 each in antique and vintage shops. Back in the day it seemed like everyone’s mom had this set of pans. How times have changed!

8) Jadeite

This drool-worthy ad from 1949 boasts the price of just $6.95 for a 53-piece set of Jadeite dishes from Fire King. That would be just under $75.00 in today’s dollars, which would still be a phenomenal price for a Jadeite set this large. Today less complete sets can sell for hundreds of dollars!

7) Tupperware

These “flavor savers” were once in just about every home in the U.S. Their popularity soared for decades until cheaper competitor’s products overtook the market. Once the domain of lady salesmen who hosted Tupperware parties, the tradition is now lost entirely. But, it sure is fun to look back on what those parties were like.

6) Pyrex

When Pyrex first came out, the borosilicate glass was considered a wonder. Never before had glass goods been so durable. For many women it simplified (and beautified) their kitchens. Again, the prices listed are really interested. Back then you could get a primary color mixing bowl set for $2.95, which would be $31.28 today. A set of these bowls can sell for between $50 and $300 depending on condition.

5) Fiestaware

This bright tableware was a prominent look in the 1930s onward. The intense colors and mix-n-match ethos featured in advertisements were very appealing to the American family who wanted both style and durability. a 20-piece set was $14.95, roughly $127.77 in today’s money. It certainly wasn’t the cheapest china even way back when!

Also featured from Homer Loughlin in this 1690 ad are the Golden Wheat and Paradise patterns- two old favorites.

4) Easy-Bake Oven

The Easy-Bake Oven was one of the most popular toys for girls in the 1960s-70s. The safety concerns were unaddressed until the 1990s models when these “ovens” became essentially low=power microwaves. But, in the old days these little ovens really did get hot! Just about every girl wanted one and there was often a lurking brother involved who didn’t want to bake, but certainly wanted to partake of the finished product.

3) Juice King

These hefty juicers always looked so nice on the counter top. If you grew up with one of these then you remember! Today they aren’t the most collectible of 1950s kitchen gadgets, but they certainly aren’t cheap today. We’ve seen them selling for up to $75!

2) Sunbeam Mixmaster

These mixers can cost a pretty penny at antique stores today, but it’s so nice to see an ad from when they were new. They came in so many colors! Coral, blue, yellow, white, and green. Many a woman coordinated her Pyrex bowls or Jadeite dishes with her Sunbeam Mixmaster.

1) Singer Sewing Machine

Singer sewing machines are some of the most beautiful sewing devices are ever made. Through the early 1950s the distinctive shape and color were still being made. It wasn’t until more modern designs of the 1960s changed the look that that recognizable shape went away. It’s also nice to see some of the different cabinets that these machines came in, too.

Historical Photos That Illustrate How Huge The Baby Boom Was: Click “Next Page” below!

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